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Annotated Bibliography


 MacNeil,G ., Kosberg,J., Daniel W. .,& Dooley, K et al.(2010).Caregiver Mental Health and Potentially Harmful Caregiving Behavior: The Central Role of Caregiver Anger.

The authors analyze the effect of mental health and behaviors on aging. The authors argue that the caregivers can affect elderly people in different ways. For example, care givers stress and mental problems lead to abusive acts against the elderly people. This in turn affects the quality of care offered to the patients. The main aim of the study was to determine the effect of mental health and behaviors on aging. The study analyzed the potential of anger to relate depression, resentment and anxiety with potential harmful behaviors. The hypothesis was to determine if mental health and behaviors of caregivers   affect the elderly people being given care. The authors also tested whether mental health   and behavior do not affect   the elderly. The results from the study showed that anger   was found to determine the relationship between anxiety and potential harmful behavior. Increase in anger among care givers increases the amount of depression and resentment   and this in turn affects aging among elderly people. The rate of aging is determined by the kind of food one eats and physical health. The study will help understand how mental health and behavior affect aging. The researchers used a total of 147 caregivers from the community. The caregivers were providing care to elderly people .Then the researchers   collected data using face to face interviews (MacNeil, Kosberg, Daniel & Dooley, 2010).


 Mahoney, R., Regan, C., Katonah, C., & Livingston, G. (2005). Anxiety and depression in family caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease — The LASER-AD study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 13, 795–801.

Anxiety and depression among family care givers of people having Alzheimer disease   affect aging. Most of the care givers either family members or relatives and are   depressed. This makes it difficulty to provide quality care to the elderly people. The authors argue that there are high rates of stress and mental illness among family   caregivers. This makes it difficulty for the care givers to take care of people having   dementias. Dementia is a major cause of aging. This is because it destroys brain cells   and makes it difficulty for the brain to function well. Several processes in the brain are affected like memory. Studies have shown that people having dementia are more likely   to get old quickly if they are not provided with the right care. The study was aimed at determining the prevalence of anxiety and depression among care givers of people   having dementia and its effects on aging. The hypothesis was to determine the effect of anxiety and stress among caregivers of patients having dementia and its relation to aging. The study also tested the effects of caregivers who did not have dementia and its effects on the patients having dementia and aging. The researcher used a total of 153 patients having dementia and their caregivers. The participants were interviewed to collect data. The results from the study showed that 23.5% and 10.5% of the care givers had high levels of anxiety and depression respectively. This in turn accelerated aging in people   having dementia as they did not get quality care. The researcher concluded that the doctors should check if family caregivers have depression or not. This will enable the   care givers to provide quality care. The content will help understand how dementia leads to aging. It will also help understand how mental health leads to aging. The source is credible as the author has organized the content well and also the content is valid(Mahoney, Regan, Katonah & Livingston, 2005).


 Miller, L. S., Lewis, M. S., Williamson, G. M., Lance, C. E., Dooley, W. K., Schulz, R., et al. (2006). Caregiver cognitive status and potentially harmful caregiver behavior. Aging and Mental Health, 10, 125–133

The author analyzes the effect of caregiver cognitive conditions and potentially harmful   behaviors on the elderly. He also analyzes how the cognitive status of the caregivers   leads to potentially harmful behaviors and affects mental health and hence aging. The researcher used a total of 180 caregivers providing service to elderly people. The results   from the study showed that 39% of the caregivers had cognitive conditions and they affected mental health and aging. The other percentage did not have cognitive status   and this did not affect mental health and aging. The amount of care given to elderly people   determines the mental healthy and aging. Some of the elderly people who get quality   care live a good life and this reduces the rate of aging. This is because the patients get good diet and exercise and support. This source help one understand the effect of cognitive status on mental health and aging. The source is credible as it has strong points (Miller,Lewis,Williamson, Lance, Dooley, Schulz, 2006).


 Shaffer, D. R., Dooley, W. K., & Williamson, G. M. (2007). Endorsement of proactively aggressive care giving strategies moderates the relation between caregiver mental health and potentially harmful caregiver behavior. Psychology and Aging, 22, 494–504

The author analyzes strategies that can be used to moderate the relationship between   care giver mental health and potentially harmful behavior. Potentially harmful behaviors have had negative effects on elderly people. They have increased the rate of aging .This will help reduce the rate of aging among elderly people as they will get quality care. The hypothesis was to determine if use of proactively aggressive Caregiving strategies could help improve mental outcome among the care givers and reduce the rate of aging and vice versa. The   researchers used a total of 417 informal caregivers. The use of the proactively   aggressive strategies improved the mental health outcome. This is according to the results from the research. The source is credible as it has relevant information. The argument presented by the author is strong( Shaffer, Dooley & Williamson, 2007).